The Lost Girls of Paris

By Pam Jenoff. 1946, Manhattan. One morning while passing through Grand Central Terminal on her way to work, Grace Healey finds an abandoned suitcase tucked beneath a bench. Unable to resist her own curiosity, Grace opens the suitcase, where she discovers a dozen photographs—each of a different woman. In a moment of impulse, Grace takes the photographs and quickly leaves the station.

Grace soon learns that the suitcase belonged to a woman named Eleanor Trigg, leader of a network of female secret agents who were deployed out of London during the war. Twelve of these women were sent to Occupied Europe as couriers and radio operators to aid the resistance, but they never returned home, their fates a mystery. Setting out to learn the truth behind the women in the photographs, Grace finds herself drawn to a young mother turned agent named Marie, whose daring mission overseas reveals a remarkable story of friendship, valor and betrayal.

Vividly rendered and inspired by true events, New York Times bestselling author Pam Jenoff shines a light on the incredible heroics of the brave women of the war and weaves a mesmerizing tale of courage, sisterhood and the great strength of women to survive in the hardest of circumstances.

Deep Creek: Finding Hope in the High Country

By Pam Houston. The author of Contents May Have Shifted draws on her travels and homestead life in the Colorado Rockies in an essay collection on her ties to nature that explores the symbiotic relationship between humans and the earth.

The Only Woman in the Room

By Marie Benedict. She possessed a stunning beauty. She also possessed a stunning mind. Could the world handle both?

Her beauty almost certainly saved her from the rising Nazi party and led to marriage with an Austrian arms dealer. Underestimated in everything else, she overheard the Third Reich’s plans while at her husband’s side, understanding more than anyone would guess. She devised a plan to flee in disguise from their castle, and the whirlwind escape landed her in Hollywood. She became Hedy Lamarr, screen star.

But she kept a secret more shocking than her heritage or her marriage: she was a scientist. And she knew a few secrets about the enemy. She had an idea that might help the country fight the Nazis…if anyone would listen to her.

A powerful novel based on the incredible true story of the glamour icon and scientist whose groundbreaking invention revolutionized modern communication, The Only Woman in the Room is a masterpiece.

Dreyer’s English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style

By Benjamin Dreyer. Authoritative as it is amusing, this book distills everything Benjamin Dreyer has learned from the hundreds of books he has copyedited, including works by Elizabeth Strout, E. L. Doctorow, and Frank Rich, into a useful guide not just for writers but for everyone who wants to put their best foot forward in writing prose. Dreyer offers lessons on the ins and outs of punctuation and grammar, including how to navigate the words he calls ‘the confusables,’ like tricky homophones; the myriad ways to use (and misuse) a comma; and how to recognize–though not necessarily do away with–the passive voice. (Hint: If you can plausibly add ‘by zombies’ to the end of a sentence, it’s passive.) People are sharing their writing more than ever–on blogs, on Twitter–and this book lays out, clearly and comprehensibly, everything writers can do to keep readers focused on the real reason writers write: to communicate their ideas clearly and effectively. Chock-full of advice, insider wisdom, and fun facts on the rules (and nonrules) of the English language, this book will prove invaluable to everyone who wants to shore up their writing skills, mandatory for people who spend their time editing and shaping other people’s prose, and–perhaps best of all–an utter treat for anyone who simply revels in language

Poetry Writing Workshop for People Who Are Sure They Can’t Write Poetry

Would you like to write a poem but don’t know where or how to begin?  Do you feel some poetic stirrings but are afraid to put pen to paper?  Come join Cortney Davis, Bethel’s Poet Laureate, for a fun, easy, non-threatening workshop on Sunday March 31st from 3:30-5:30 during which you will discover your inner bard.  Through a series of prompts and writing exercises, you will find yourself writing poems–and hopefully go home invigorated with renewed belief in your own creativity abilities.

Bring a pad of lined paper, pen or pencil, an open mind and a sense of humor.

To register, click HERE.

($10 fee)

Where is Antarctica?

Explore Antarctica–the coldest, driest, and windiest continent on Earth–in this adventure-filled title in the Who HQ series.

Antarctica, the earth’s southernmost continent, was virtually untouched by humans until the nineteenth century. Many famous explorers journeyed (and often died) there in the hope of discovering a land that always seemed out of reach. This book introduces readers to this desert–yes, desert!–continent that holds about 90 percent of the world’s ice; showcases some of the 200 species that call Antarctica home, including the emperor penguin; and discusses environmental dangers to the continent, underscoring how what happens to Antarctica affects the entire world.

Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother’s Will to Survive

By Stephanie Land. A journalist describes the years she worked in low-paying domestic work under wealthy employers, contrasting the privileges of the upper-middle class to the realities of the overworked laborers supporting them.

The Hidden Corpse comes to Byrd’s Books!

Join us as we welcome Debra Sennefelder Tuesday April 9th at 7:00pm for a discussion and signing of her book, The Hidden Corpse.

About the book:

Former reality TV baking show contestant and recent divorcée Hope Early is trying to find her recipe for success as a food blogger–but murder keeps getting in the mix . . .When Hope’s elderly neighbor perishes in a home fire, she can’t help but feel somewhat responsible. Only the day before, Peggy Olson had called her over, having burned a pot on the stove while she was sleeping and filling the house with smoke. In fact, she couldn’t even remember cooking. Clearly, it was dangerous for the woman to live alone.But it turns out she wasn’t alone. When a second body is discovered in the basement of the burned house, suddenly what appeared to be a tragic accident is beginning to look like premeditated murder. As rumors spread like wildfire, Hope is determined to sort out the facts and smoke out a killer, but she might be jumping from the frying pan straight into the fire . . .Includes Recipes from Hope’s Kitchen!
Note: This is a mass- market paperback
To learn more or register for this event, click HERE.
About the author: 
Debra Sennefelder is an avid reader who reads across a range of genres, but mystery fiction is her obsession. Her interest in people and relationships is channeled into her novels against a backdrop of crime and mystery. When she’s not reading, she enjoys cooking and baking and, as a former food blogger, she is constantly taking photographs of her food. Yeah, she’s that person. Born and raised in New York City, she now lives in Connecticut with her family. She’s worked in pre-hospital care, retail, and publishing. Her writing companions are her adorable and slightly spoiled shih-tzus, Susie and Billy. She is a member of Sisters in Crime and Romance Writers of America. You can learn more at www.DebraSennefelder.com.

Women Rowing North: Navigating Life’s Currents and Flourishing As We Age

By Mary Pipher. The best-selling author of Reviving Ophelia presents a guide to wisdom, authenticity and bliss for women as they age, exploring how the myriad roles and challenges of women can help promote balance and a transcendent sense of well-being.

Planting Stories: The Life of Librarian and Storyteller Pura Belpre

By Anika Aldamuy Denise. A lyrical picture book portrait of New York City’s first Puerto Rican librarian describes how Pura Belpré moved to America in 1921 and became an influential writer and puppeteer who is celebrated for championing bilingual literature.

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