Victoria Price joins us to share her new book, “The Way of Being Lost”

Please join us on Saturday February 17th at 3:00pm as we celebrate the release of Victoria Price’s new book, “The Way of Being Lost: A Road Trip to My Truest Self

To save a spot, click HERE.

About the book:

Despite doing “all the right things” to successfully rebuild her life and her finances after a period of deep personal and professional turmoil where she lost almost everything, Victoria Price still felt something profoundly missing from her life. Her new book, THE WAY OF BEING LOST: A Road Trip to My Truest Self (Ixia, February 14, 2018, Hardcover, eBook), is a heartfelt, candid account of rediscovering her joy and purpose after years of struggle, confusion and hopelessness.

As a child, Victoria’s mother was terrified of her daughter’s free-spirited-ness, and tried to rein it in with common sense and tough love. As an adult still following her mother’s “rules”, she not only had lost her money, her home, and her relationship, she had also lost her self. Realizing she literally had nothing left to lose, Victoria understood that in order to live her truest life, she had to be willing to find a way to let go of her fears and the nagging voice in the back of her head.

Embarking on a metaphoric and literal road trip to find her way home to her truest self, Victoria chose to become intentionally homeless. Along the way, she learned how to reprogram the messages she had internalized, taking inspiration from her father Vincent Price’s example: his love for people and compassion for others, his generosity of spirit and simple kindnesses, his enthusiasm for new experiences, and his love of life. As she got to know her father again through attending horror conventions and celebrations of his life, Victoria decided to live as what she came to call THE WAY OF BEING LOST. Victoria learned how to reincorporate her father’s joie de vivre into her own life journey.

About the author:

Victoria Price is the author of the critically acclaimed Vincent Price: A Daughter’s Biography. A popular inspirational speaker on topics ranging from art collecting and design to creativity and spirituality, as well as the life of her famous father, Price has appeared on Good Morning America, A&E’s Biography, and NPR’s Fresh Air and Morning Edition. Her work has been featured in USA TodayPeopleTravel & LeisureArt & Auction, and The New York Times.

Reviews for “the Way of Being Lost”:

“Discovering the religious perspective of interspirituality proved to be decisive in Price’s growth and healing, and she offers a five-step process to help others “release qualities that may once have served us but no longer do. Heartfelt testimony of an arduous search for self-affirmation that will appeal to fellow seekers. “ – Kirkus Reviews

“As one who’s lost his way more than a few times, I found this book true to the bone, hopeful to the core, and wonderfully well-written. Victoria Price tells a personal story so brilliantly it allows her readers to shine a bright light on their own experiences of getting lost. In a world of so many lost souls, she points the way to true north.” – Parker J. Palmer, Author of Let Your Life Speak, A Hidden Wholeness, and On the Brink of Everything

“The Way of Being Lost takes us on the most exquisite journey that one can take—the road home to one’s true self… told through the particular lens of the author’s life. Though it takes great courage to make this trip, the rewards are beyond measure. And in the case of The Way of Being Lost, the journey is beautifully told, universally relevant, and deeply meaningful.” – Christiane Northrup, M.D., New York Times bestselling author of Goddesses Never Age

“Too often we think that to lead a spiritual life requires doing everything right. That is not just a tall order, it is an erroneous one. Spirituality is about a quest for a home in love, which we will find when we finally recognize that our truest selves are calling us home. As Victoria Price knows, this journey may come later than we hoped, but it bears the fruit of our life experience, and takes its own time to ripen. This beautiful recounting of Victoria’s voyage shows us a path for discovering the Third Way and living it fully.” – Fr. Richard Rohr, Founder of the Center for Action and Contemplation

To the Last Breath: A Memoir of Going to Extremes

By Francis Slakey

A journey to the most extreme points on Earth and deep inside the human spirit.

Before Georgetown physics professor Francis Slakey set out to climb the highest mountain on every continent and surf every ocean, he had shut himself off from other people. His lectures were mechanical; his relationships were little more than ways to fill the evenings. But as his journey veered dangerously off course, everything about him began to change.

A gripping adventure of the body and mind, To the Last Breath depicts the quest that leads Slakey around the globe, almost takes his life, challenges his fiercely held beliefs, and opens his heart. The scientist in Slakey explores the history of Robert Falcon Scott’s doomed Antarctica expedition, the technology of climbing, and the geophysics of waves. But it is the challenges he endures and the people he encounters – a Lama who gives him a mysterious amulet, a life-or-death choice atop Everest, an ambush at gunpoint in Indonesia, a head-on collision in the high desert – that culminate in a moving lesson about what it means to be human.

Cures for Hunger

By Deni Y. Béchard

“As the motor’s vibrations cradled me, I tried to envision my life. I saw the red lines of highways on the map, stretched between cities like threads of torn cloth. I imagined a book that could hold it all together, plains and mountain ranges, dust-drab towns beyond interstates, and somewhere on the far edges, the valley in British Columbia and those nights in Virginia when I snuck out and stalked the highway, trying to fathom where I belonged on this threadbare continent.”

As a child growing up in rural British Columbia, Deni Béchard had no idea that his family was extraordinary. With a father prone to racing trains and brawling, and a mother with interest in health food and the otherworldly, Deni finds pleasure in typical boyish activities: fishing for salmon with his father, and reading with his mother.

Assigned to complete a family tree in school, Deni begins to wonder why he doesn’t know more about his father’s side of the family. His mother is from Pittsburgh, and there is a vague sense that his father is from Quebec, but why the mystery? When his mother leaves Deni’s father and decamps with her three children to Virginia, his curiosity only grows. Who is this man, why do the police seem so interested in him, and why is his mother so afraid of him? And when his mother begrudgingly tells Deni that his father was once a bank robber, his imagination is set on fire. Boyish rebelliousness soon gives way to fantasies of a life of crime, and a deep drive for experience leads him to a number of adventures, hitching to Memphis and stealing a motorcycle; fighting classmates and kissing girls.

Before long, young Deni is imagining himself as a character in one of his father’s stories, or in the novels he devours greedily. At once attracted and repelled, Deni can’t escape the sense that his father’s life holds the key to understanding himself, and to making sense of his own passions, aversions, and motivations. Eventually he moves back to British Columbia, only to find himself snared in the controlling impulses of his mysterious father, and increasingly obsessed by his father’s own muted recollections of the Quebecois childhood he’d fled long ago.

At once an extraordinary family story and a highly unconventional portrait of the artist as a young man, Cures for Hunger is a singular, deeply affecting memoir, by one of the most acclaimed young writers in the world today.

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