Percy Jackson’s Greek Gods

PercyJacksonsGreekGodsBy Rick Riordan

“A publisher in New York asked me to write down what I know about the Greek gods, and I was like, Can we do this anonymously? Because I don’t need the Olympians mad at me again. But if it helps you to know your Greek gods, and survive an encounter with them if they ever show up in your face, then I guess writing all this down will be my good deed for the week.”

So begins Percy Jackson’s Greek Gods, in which the son of Poseidon adds his own magic – and sarcastic asides – to the classics. He explains how the world was created, then gives readers his personal take on a who’s who of ancients, from Apollo to Zeus. Percy does not hold back. “If you like horror shows, blood baths, lying, stealing, backstabbing, and cannibalism, then read on, because it definitely was a Golden Age for all that.”

Dramatic full-color illustrations throughout by Caldecott Honoree John Rocco make this volume – a must for home, library, and classroom shelves – as stunning as it is entertaining.

Song of the Vikings

Song of the VikingsSong of the Vikings: Snorri and the Making of Norse Myths by Nancy Marie Brown

Much like Greek and Roman mythology, Norse myths are still with us. Famous storytellers from J.R.R. Tolkien to Neil Gaiman have drawn their inspiration from the long-haired, mead-drinking, marauding and pillaging Vikings. Their creator is a thirteenth-century Icelandic chieftain by the name of Snorri Sturluson. Like Homer, Snorri was a bard, writing down and embellishing the folklore and pagan legends of medieval Scandinavia. Unlike Homer, Snorri was a man of the world – a wily political power player, one of the richest men in Iceland who came close to ruling it, and even closer to betraying it… In Song of the Vikings, award-winning author Nancy Marie Brown brings Snorri Sturluson’s story to life in a richly textured narrative that draws on newly available sources.

The Death of King Arthur: A New Verse Translation

The Death of King Arthur coverBy Simon Armitage

First appearing around 1400, The Alliterative Morte Arthure, or The Death of King Arthur, is one of the most widely beloved and spectacularly alliterative poems ever penned in Middle English. Now, from the internationally acclaimed translator of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, comes this magisterial new presentation of the Arthurian tale, rendered in unflinching and gory detail. Following Arthur’s bloody conquests across the cities and fields of Europe, all the way to his spectacular and even bloodier fall, this masterpiece features some of the most spellbinding and poignant passages in English poetry.

The Odyssey

The Odyssey coverWritten & illustrated by Gareth Hinds

Retells, in graphic novel format, Homer’s epic tale of Odysseus, the ancient Greek hero who encounters witches and other obstacles on his journey home after fighting in the Trojan War. Beautifully illustrated, the classic epic is retold in a completely new way.

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