Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs

By Mo Willems

Once upon a time, there were three hungry Dinosaurs: Papa Dinosaur, Mama Dinosaur…and a Dinosaur who happened to be visiting from Norway.

One day – “for no particular reason” – they decided to tidy up their house, make the beds, and prepare pudding of varying temperatures. And then – “for no particular reason” – they decided to go…someplace else. They were definitely not setting a trap for some succulent, unsupervised little girl.

Definitely not!

This new take on a fairy-tale classic is so funny and so original – it could only come from the brilliant mind of Mo Willems.

This funny, original picture book is adorably written & illustrated by Mo Willems, a much-beloved children’s author. It would make an excellent gift to a child of picture-book age, as would any Mo Willems title (Byrd’s Books stocks several).

The Duckling Gets a Cookie!?

By Mo Willems

The Duckling asks for a cookie – and gets one! Do you think the Pigeon is happy about that?

“Pigeon is back and he’s not happy. The duckling gets a cookie just because she asked (politely). The cookie even has nuts! Pigeon is simply outraged. He asks for things all the time, to drive a bus, to have a hot dog party, a French Fry Robot, a walrus, and he never gets what he wants! It’s just not fair that ducklings get everything, because Pigeons like cookies, too!” —Amy Musser, Goodreads reviewer

About Average

By Andrew Clements

Can average be amazing? A girl challenges herself to become extraordinary in the latest from bestselling author Andrew Clements.

Jordan Johnston is average. Not short, not tall. Not plump, not slim. Not blond, not brunette. Not gifted, not flunking out. Even her shoe size is average. She’s ordinary for her school, for her town, for even the whole wide world, it seems.

But everyone else? They’re remarkable. She sees evidence everywhere – on TV, in magazines, and even in her classroom. Tremendously talented. Stunningly beautiful. Wildly gifted. And some of them are practically her age!

Jordan feels doomed to a life of wallowing in the vast, soggy middle. So she makes a goal: By the end of the year, she will discover her great talent. By the end of the year, she will no longer be average. She will find a way to become extraordinary, and everyone will know about it!

Well known for his expert ability to relate to kids in a school setting, bestselling author Andrew Clements presents a compelling story of the greatest achievement possible – personal acceptance.

Racing the Moon

By Alan Armstrong

An adventurous new work from Newbery Honor-Winning author, Alan Armstrong.

In the spring of 1947, outer space was an unexplored realm. But eleven year-old Alexis (Alex) Heart and her impulsive brother, Chuck, believe that the stars are within reach. In the midst of building their own rocket, Alex befriends Captain Ebbs, and an army scientist who is working to create food for future space travelers, and who is also a descendent of Captain John Smith. Alex soon introduces Chuck to her new friend, and the trio’s shared interest in space travel sets off a series of adventures that the three will never forget. From meeting pioneering German rocket scientist Dr. Wenher von Braun, and a thrilling sailing trip down the Potomac to an island on the Chesapeake where a top secret rocket launch is about to take place, Alex and Chuck are about to have their lives forever changed.

Summer of the Gypsy Moths

By Sara Pennypacker

Stella loves living with Great-aunt Louise in her big old house near the water on Cape Cod for many reasons, but mostly because Louise likes routine as much as she does, something Stella appreciates since her mom is, well, kind of unreliable. So while Mom “finds herself,” Stella fantasizes that someday she’ll come back to the Cape and settle down. The only obstacle to her plan? Angel, the foster kid Louise has taken in. Angel couldn’t be less like her name–she’s tough and prickly, and the girls hardly speak to each other.

But when tragedy unexpectedly strikes, Stella and Angel are forced to rely on each other to survive, and they learn that they are stronger together than they could have imagined. And over the course of the summer they discover the one thing they do have in common: dreams of finally belonging to a real family.

Horsefly and Honeybee

Written & illustrated by Randy Cecil

When Honeybee decides to take a nap in the same flower as Horsefly, trouble ensues! They don’t want to share, and after quarreling, run away in opposite directions. But it isn’t long until they meet again… They have both been captured by hungry Bullfrog! If Horsefly and Honeybee are to escape before dinnertime, they must find a way to work together. With beautiful illustrations and simple text, this is a sweet story about sharing and friendship.

Mario Makes a Move

Written & Illustrated by Jill McElmurry

Mario is a squirrel who loves to invent amazing moves, like the Super Looper and Tail, Don’t Fail. But though his parents “ooh” and “ahh” at whatever he does, his friend Isabelle is not so easily impressed. When she points out that “anyone” can have a move, Mario must find some other way to stand out.

Sometimes being amazing is hard work, as shown in this zany yet accessible picture book from Jill McElmurry, illustrator of The One and Only Marigold and Little Blue Truck. Young readers will instantly recognize themselves in Mario, as he searches for his one-of-a-kind talent. Here is a hilarious read-aloud that will have little ones oohing and ahhing – and trying out some moves of their own.

House Held Up by Trees

By Ted Kooser

Illustrated by Jon Klassen

“Not far from here, I have seen a house help up by the hands of trees. This is its story.”

From Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Ted Kooser and rising talent Jon Klassen comes a poignant tale of loss, change, and nature’s quiet triumph.

When the house was new, not a single tree remained on its perfect lawn to give shade from the sun. The children in the house trailed the scent of wild trees to neighboring lots, where thick bushes offered up secret places to play. When the children grew up and moved away, their father, alone in the house, continued his battle against blowing seeds, plucking out sprouting trees. Until one day the father, too, moved away, and as the empty house began its decline, the trees began their approach. At once wistful and exhilarating, this lovely, lyrical story evokes the inexorable passage of time – and the awe-inspiring power of nature to lift us up.


The Family Tree

By David McPhail

A man in the 1800s comes upon a beautiful forest and decides to build his home there. When he clears the land, he leaves one special tree to grace his front yard. Over the years, several generations of his family enjoy this tree, but it is endangered by a plan to build a highway. A young boy and his host of animal friends get together to make a stand, and give back to the tree which has given them so much. With lavish illustrations and very few words, David McPhail delivers a timeless environmental message and a heartwarming story for ages 4 to 8.

An Awesome Book!

By Dallas Clayton

Based on the simple concept of dreaming big, “An Awesome Book!” is the inspiring debut work of Los Angeles writer/artist Dallas Clayton. Written in the vein of classic imaginative tales, it is a sure hit for all generations, young and old.

About the Author

HELLO MY NAME IS DALLAS CLAYTON. This is all you need to know to understand what goes on here:

I try to make things that are beautiful.

Sometimes these things are written down.

Sometimes they are drawn.

Sometimes they are wrapped and plastic and sold in important stores for more money than they cost to manufacture.

I love making most things.

I am most interested in making people happy.

I have a son who is six years old.

I enjoy making him happy most of all.

I would like to do this more and more every day forever.

This is why I write for children.

When I am not writing for children I am writing for adults and the companies adults run, drawing pictures for those adults, and reading things out loud to crowds of strangers.

I love strangers.

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