Becca and the Prisoner’s Cross

Becca-Tony AbbottA follow-up to Wade and the Scorpion’s Claw finds studious language expert Becca suffering from mysterious blackouts that allow her to see the time of Copernicus, where she receives coded messages about a next relic.

Night Sky Detective

NightSkyA series that encourages hands-on learning includes 30 easy activities that help children observe, explore and learn about the natural world while explaining the science behind the activities through clear, step-by-step, photographically illustrated instructions that can be carried out right at home.

Billy’s Booger

Billys BoogerA boy who prefers drawing to all other activities fails to impress his teacher and principal with his lackluster grades until the local librarian encourages him to enter a book-making contest. By the best-selling author of The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore.

Lost Boy

Lost BoyAfter a near-fatal car accident, 12-year-old Ryder’s mother needs an operation they cannot afford and while a new friend tries to raise funds, Ryder travels with a grouchy, disabled neighbor from Yankee Stadium to Turner Field seeking the major league baseball player who might be Ryder’s father.

A Perfectly Messed-Up Story

PerfectlyMessedUpA Perfectly Messed-Up Story
By Patrick McDonnell

In this interactive and engaging read-aloud, bestselling author and award-winning artist Patrick McDonnell creates a funny, engaging, and almost perfect story about embracing life’s messes.

Little Louie’s story keeps getting messed up, and he’s not happy about it! What’s the point of telling his tale if he can’t tell it perfectly? But when he stops and takes a deep breath, he realizes that everything is actually just fine, and his story is a good one – imperfections and all.

The Book With No Pictures

BookNoPicturesThe Book with No Pictures
By B.J. Novak

A #1 New York Times bestseller, this innovative and wildly funny read-aloud by award-winning humorist/actor B.J. Novak will turn any reader into a comedian.

You might think a book with no pictures seems boring and serious. Except… here’s how books work. Everything written on the page “has” to be said by the person reading it aloud. Even if the words say…

BLORK. Or BLUURF.

Even if the words are a preposterous song about eating ants for breakfast, or just a list of astonishingly goofy sounds like BLAGGITY BLAGGITY and GLIBBITY GLOBBITY.

Cleverly irreverent and irresistibly silly, The Book with No Pictures is one that kids will beg to hear again and again. (And parents will be happy to oblige.)

Animal Stories: Heartwarming True Tales from the Animal Kingdom

AnimalStoriesAnimal Stories
By Jane Yolen, illustrated by Jui Ishida

Amazing animal stories that span the centuries come to life in this beautifully written and illustrated book. Some are sweet, some funny, some surprising, but all are emotionally powerful – the Capitolene geese who saved the Roman empire, Balto the Alaskan sled dog, Smoky the Bear, the passenger pigeon of WWI Cher Ami, and the latest internet sensation Christian the lion. A collection such as this comes along only once in a generation, full of heartwarming tales that families will read, re-read, and remember.

About Average

By Andrew Clements

Can average be amazing? A girl challenges herself to become extraordinary in the latest from bestselling author Andrew Clements.

Jordan Johnston is average. Not short, not tall. Not plump, not slim. Not blond, not brunette. Not gifted, not flunking out. Even her shoe size is average. She’s ordinary for her school, for her town, for even the whole wide world, it seems.

But everyone else? They’re remarkable. She sees evidence everywhere – on TV, in magazines, and even in her classroom. Tremendously talented. Stunningly beautiful. Wildly gifted. And some of them are practically her age!

Jordan feels doomed to a life of wallowing in the vast, soggy middle. So she makes a goal: By the end of the year, she will discover her great talent. By the end of the year, she will no longer be average. She will find a way to become extraordinary, and everyone will know about it!

Well known for his expert ability to relate to kids in a school setting, bestselling author Andrew Clements presents a compelling story of the greatest achievement possible – personal acceptance.

Racing the Moon

By Alan Armstrong

An adventurous new work from Newbery Honor-Winning author, Alan Armstrong.

In the spring of 1947, outer space was an unexplored realm. But eleven year-old Alexis (Alex) Heart and her impulsive brother, Chuck, believe that the stars are within reach. In the midst of building their own rocket, Alex befriends Captain Ebbs, and an army scientist who is working to create food for future space travelers, and who is also a descendent of Captain John Smith. Alex soon introduces Chuck to her new friend, and the trio’s shared interest in space travel sets off a series of adventures that the three will never forget. From meeting pioneering German rocket scientist Dr. Wenher von Braun, and a thrilling sailing trip down the Potomac to an island on the Chesapeake where a top secret rocket launch is about to take place, Alex and Chuck are about to have their lives forever changed.

Summer of the Gypsy Moths

By Sara Pennypacker

Stella loves living with Great-aunt Louise in her big old house near the water on Cape Cod for many reasons, but mostly because Louise likes routine as much as she does, something Stella appreciates since her mom is, well, kind of unreliable. So while Mom “finds herself,” Stella fantasizes that someday she’ll come back to the Cape and settle down. The only obstacle to her plan? Angel, the foster kid Louise has taken in. Angel couldn’t be less like her name–she’s tough and prickly, and the girls hardly speak to each other.

But when tragedy unexpectedly strikes, Stella and Angel are forced to rely on each other to survive, and they learn that they are stronger together than they could have imagined. And over the course of the summer they discover the one thing they do have in common: dreams of finally belonging to a real family.

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