Magnitude: The Scale of the Universe

By Kimberly Arcand and Megan Watzke. In a book featuring full-color illustrations and infographics throughout, the authors take readers on an expansive journey to the limits of size, mass, distance time and temperature in our universe.

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By Theodore Gray. In a follow-up to The Elements and Molecules, a internationally best-selling author and app creator demonstrates how the focus of his first two books combine to create chemical reactions including combustion, photosynthesis, respiration and oxidation.

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How to Read Water: Clues and Patterns from Puddles to the Sea

By Tristan Gooley. The outdoor pioneer behind The Lost Art of Reading NatureÆs Signs shares hundreds of techniques to help navigate and decode bodies of water, including how to find North using puddles and how to forecast the weather from ocean waves.

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The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit

By Michael Finkel. (Winner of the New Englad Bookseller’s Association Non-Fiction Book of the Year 2017). Documents the true story of a man who endured a hardscrabble, isolated existence in a tent in the Maine woods, never speaking with others and surviving by stealing supplies from nearby cabins, for 27 years, in a portrait that illuminates the survival means he developed and the reasons behind his solitary life.


For readers of Jon Krakauer and The Lost City of Z, a remarkable tale of survival and solitude–the true story of a man who lived alone in a tent in the Maine woods, never talking to another person and surviving by stealing supplies from nearby cabins for twenty-seven years.

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The Ground Beneath Us: From the Oldest Cities to the Last Wilderness, What Dirt Tells Us About Who We Are

By Paul Bogard

Our most compelling resource just might be the ground beneath our feet.

When a teaspoon of soil contains millions of species, and when we pave over the earth on a daily basis, what does that mean for our future? What is the risk to our food supply, the planet’s wildlife, the soil on which every life-form depends? How much undeveloped, untrodden ground do we even have left?

Paul Bogard set out to answer these questions in The Ground Beneath Us, and what he discovered is astounding.

From New York (where more than 118,000,000 tons of human development rest on top of Manhattan Island) to Mexico City (which sinks inches each year into the Aztec ruins beneath it), Bogard shows us the weight of our cities’ footprints. And as we see hallowed ground coughing up bullets at a Civil War battlefield; long-hidden remains emerging from below the sites of concentration camps; the dangerous, alluring power of fracking; the fragility of the giant redwoods, our planet’s oldest living things; the surprises hidden under a Major League ballpark’s grass; and the sublime beauty of our few remaining wildest places, one truth becomes blazingly clear: The ground is the easiest resource to forget, and the last we should.

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100 Plants to Feed the Bees: Provide a Healthy Habitat to Help Pollinators Thrive

100-plantsBees, along with other pollinators, are essential to food production and ultimately human life, and their survival is in critical peril. One of the simplest ways we can help ensure their future is by providing and protecting the plants they thrive on. In an at-a-glance, photo-driven format, 100 Plants to Save the Bees presents 100 nectar- and pollen-rich plants that home gardeners can cultivate to create a more bee-friendly world and turn their backyards, fields, and vacant lots into pollinator paradises.

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The Lion in the Living Room: How House Cats Tamed Us and Took Over the World

By Abigail Tucker. Discusses the natural history of domesticated felines and how they achieved global domination, despite offering humans no practical benefits, through visiting researchers who discovered feline bones in the first human settlements and searching for house cats on the loose in Florida.

The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate: Discoveries from a Secret World

hidden-treesBy Peter Wohlleben. Draws on up-to-date research and engaging forester stories to reveal how trees nurture each other and communicate, outlining the life cycles of “tree families” that support mutual growth, share nutrients and contribute to a resilient ecosystem. Illustrations.

The Man Who Made Things Out of Trees

Man who made thingsA history of the role of ash trees in the English-speaking world draws on expert understandings of ash’s wide-ranging properties, revealing the thriving existence of ancient traditions in ash craftsmanship while exposing threats to today’s remaining ash forests.

Random Acts of Kindness by Animals

By Stephanie Laland. The French poet, Theophile Gautier once asked, “Who can believe that there is no soul behind those luminous eyes?” And it’s true – if you have ever loved an animal, you know that there is something special about them. Random Acts of Kindness by Animals proves it, through amazing and heartwarming true tales of animal compassion, devotion, and bravery. In the pages of this book readers will meet remarkable dogs and cats, as well as gorillas, dolphins, bears, seagulls, rats, birds, and one heroic pig! Even ants are caught practicing compassion, as they’re observed pulling a thorn from an injured comrade.

Included are wellpublicized stories, such as the gorilla that carried an injured child to safety, as well as the more obscure, like the German Shepherd that visited the grave of his deceased owner every day at the same hour. This sweet book also reflects human acts of kindness to animals. Edward Lear, author of The Owl and the Pussycat, built his new house as an exact replica of his old one to keep from traumatizing his beloved cat.

Random Acts of Kindness by Animals proves that these are thinking creatures with real emotions – hardly news to animal lovers – and provides a window into the lives of some amazing critters!

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