Start Where You Are: A Guide to Compassionate Living

By Pema Chodron. An American Buddhist nun explains how to become compassionate and fearless by accepting the pain in individual lives in their present state through the study of fifty-nine traditional Tibetan Buddhist sayings.

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The Weather Detective: Rediscovering Nature’s Secret Signs

By Peter Wolleben. Demonstrates how to decipher nature’s secret signs by studying the weather, exploring the relationship between weather and natural phenomena.

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The Meaning of Birds

By Simon Barnes. An illustrated examination of the lives of birds looks at how they achieve the miracle of flight, why they sing, what they tell us about the seasons of the year, the uses of feathers, and what the migration of birds can tell us about climate change.

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Magnitude: The Scale of the Universe

By Kimberly Arcand and Megan Watzke. In a book featuring full-color illustrations and infographics throughout, the authors take readers on an expansive journey to the limits of size, mass, distance time and temperature in our universe.

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Many: The Diversity of Life on Earth

By Nicola Davies. A follow-up to the award-winning Tiny Creatures combines lyrical text and lavishly detailed illustrations to introduce the vast diversity of life on Earth and explain how it is all part of a beautiful and complicated pattern that must be preserved for the benefit of all.

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Reactions

By Theodore Gray. In a follow-up to The Elements and Molecules, a internationally best-selling author and app creator demonstrates how the focus of his first two books combine to create chemical reactions including combustion, photosynthesis, respiration and oxidation.

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How to Read Nature: Awaken Your Senses to the Outdoors You’ve Never Noticed: Taste Direction, Smell Time, Hear the Weather, and More

By Tristan Gooley. An expert on natural navigation invites readers to experience the outdoors like never before by combining his philosophy with 15 simple exercises that he hopes will reawaken the senses and help people their own discoveries about the natural world around them.

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How to Read Water: Clues and Patterns from Puddles to the Sea

By Tristan Gooley. The outdoor pioneer behind The Lost Art of Reading NatureÆs Signs shares hundreds of techniques to help navigate and decode bodies of water, including how to find North using puddles and how to forecast the weather from ocean waves.

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The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit

By Michael Finkel. (Winner of the New Englad Bookseller’s Association Non-Fiction Book of the Year 2017). Documents the true story of a man who endured a hardscrabble, isolated existence in a tent in the Maine woods, never speaking with others and surviving by stealing supplies from nearby cabins, for 27 years, in a portrait that illuminates the survival means he developed and the reasons behind his solitary life.


For readers of Jon Krakauer and The Lost City of Z, a remarkable tale of survival and solitude–the true story of a man who lived alone in a tent in the Maine woods, never talking to another person and surviving by stealing supplies from nearby cabins for twenty-seven years.

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The Ground Beneath Us: From the Oldest Cities to the Last Wilderness, What Dirt Tells Us About Who We Are

By Paul Bogard

Our most compelling resource just might be the ground beneath our feet.

When a teaspoon of soil contains millions of species, and when we pave over the earth on a daily basis, what does that mean for our future? What is the risk to our food supply, the planet’s wildlife, the soil on which every life-form depends? How much undeveloped, untrodden ground do we even have left?

Paul Bogard set out to answer these questions in The Ground Beneath Us, and what he discovered is astounding.

From New York (where more than 118,000,000 tons of human development rest on top of Manhattan Island) to Mexico City (which sinks inches each year into the Aztec ruins beneath it), Bogard shows us the weight of our cities’ footprints. And as we see hallowed ground coughing up bullets at a Civil War battlefield; long-hidden remains emerging from below the sites of concentration camps; the dangerous, alluring power of fracking; the fragility of the giant redwoods, our planet’s oldest living things; the surprises hidden under a Major League ballpark’s grass; and the sublime beauty of our few remaining wildest places, one truth becomes blazingly clear: The ground is the easiest resource to forget, and the last we should.

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