Poetry with Marilyn Nelson

We were honored to host former Poet Laureate of the State of Connecticut Marilyn Nelson on Saturday June 20th at 4:00p.m. for a poetry reading at the bookstore. Marilyn_Nelson

Faster than lightHer latest book, Faster Than Light is described as conjuring numerous voices and characters across oceans and centuries explores widely disparate experiences through the lens of traditional poetic forms.

Her book for a younger audience, How I Discovered Poetry, The National Book Award, Newbery Honor and multiple Coretta Scott King Honor-winning poet reflects on her childhood in the 1950s and her development as an artist and young woman through 50 illuminating poems that consider such influences as the Civil Rights Movement, the “Red Scare” atomic bomb era and the Feminist Movement. How i discovered

From her bio:

Marilyn Nelson, born in Cleveland, Ohio, is the daughter of a member of the last graduating class of Tuskegee Airmen. Her mother was a teacher. She is the author or translator of over twenty-four books. Marilyn’s latest collection of poems is Faster Than Light(2012), winner of the 2013 Milton Kessler Poetry Award. The Homeplace (1990) was a finalist for the National Book Award. The Fields of Praise: New and Selected Poems (1997) won the 1998 Poets’ Prize and was a finalist for the 1997 National Book Award, the PEN Winship Award, and the Lenore Marshall Prize. The Cachoiera Tales and Other Poems (2005) won the L.E. Phillabaum Award and was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award.

Her numerous young adult books include Carver: A Life in Poems (2001), which received the Flora Stieglitz Straus Award and the Boston Globe/Horn Book Award, was a National Book Award finalist and was designated both a Newbery Honor Book and a Coretta Scott King Honor Book. Another of her young adult booksA Wreath For Emmett Till, also won the 2005 Boston Globe/Horn Book Award and was designated a 2006 Coretta Scott King Honor Book, a 2006 Michael L. Printz Honor Book, and a 2006 Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Award Honor Book.

Her honors include two NEA creative writing fellowships, the 1990 Connecticut Arts Award, an A.C.L.S. Contemplative Practices Fellowship, the Department of the Army’s Commander’s Award for Public Service, a Fulbright Teaching Fellowship and a fellowship from the J.S. Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Nelson is a professor emerita of English at the University of Connecticut, was founder/director and host of Soul Mountain Retreat, and held the office of Poet Laureate of the State of Connecticut from 2001 to 2006. She is currently Poet-in-Residence of The Poets Corner at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine. Also, her forthcoming books are Seneca Village (Namelos) and American Ace (Penguin/Dial).

Marilyn was awarded the 2012 Frost Medal, the Poetry Society of America’s most prestigious award, for “distinguished lifetime achievement in poetry.” In January 2013 she was elected a Chancellor of The Academy of American Poets. Her latest collection for young adults is How I Discovered Poetry (Dial, 2014), a memoir in verse with illustrations by Hadley Hooper.

The author was introduced by her friend and Byrd’s Books Connecticut author, Donna Marie Merritt, who will read a poem from her book, Her House and Other Poems. Donna Marie Merritt is the author of four poetry books, including Her House and Other Poems(Stairwell Books, 2013) and What’s Wrong with Ordinary? Poems to Celebrate Life (Avalon Press, 2012). Her work has been included in a number of anthologies, most recently, Garbanzo Literary Journal, vol. 5. Forthcoming poems will be published in National Geographic’s Book of Nature Poetry (Oct. 2015) and, for younger readers, Little, Brown’s One Minute Till Bedtime (Spring 2016).

 

 

Faster Than Light

Faster Than LightFaster Than Light: New and Selected Poems, 1996-2011 by Marilyn Nelson, Connecticut poet and UConn professor

Conjuring numerous voices and characters across oceans and centuries, Faster Than Light explores widely disparate experiences through the lens of traditional poetic forms. This volume contains a selection of Marilyn Nelson’s new and uncollected poems as well as work from each of her lyric histories of eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century African-American individuals and communities, and The Cachoeira Tales, a long riff on Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Poems include the stories of historical figures like Emmett Till, the fourteen-year-old boy lynched in 1955, and the inhabitants of Seneca Village, an African American community razed in 1857 for the creation of Central Park. Bivouac in a Storm tells the story of a group of young soldiers, later to become known as the Tuskegee Airmen, as they trained near Biloxi, Mississippi, “marching in summer heat / thick as blackstrap molasses, under trees / haunted by whippings.” Later pieces range from the poet’s travels in Africa, Europe, and Polynesia, to poems written in collaboration with Father Jacques de Foiard Brown, a former Benedictine monk who becomes the subject of Nelson’s playful fictional fantasy sequence, Adventure-Monk! Both personal and historical, these poems are grounded in quotidian detail but reach toward spiritual and moral truths.

An Introduction to the Prose Poem

Edited by Brian Clements and Jamey Dunham

An Introduction to the Prose Poem clears a new path for students, instructors, and general readers interested in exploring the “ramshackle and unexpected… thoroughfare” [Campbell McGrath] of a hard-to-define genre. For students and instructors, the anthology provides an implicit history of the genre, a wide array of models and strategies, and a map of the prose poem’s potential via dozens of poets, a useful introductory essay and headnotes, and an innovative structure. For readers, it provides what every poetry fan wants—a ton of great poems by over 100 renowned poets!

Brian Clements is the editor of Sentence: a Journal of Prose Poetics and the author of several collections of poetry, including Disappointed Psalms (Meritage Press) and And How to End It (Quale Press). He is a Professor of Writing, Linguistics, and Creative Process at Western Connecticut State University, where he coordinates the MFA in Creative and Professional Writing.

Jamey Dunham is the author of The Bible of Lost Pets (Salt Modern Poets). He is an Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing at Sinclair Community College in Dayton, Ohio.

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